Fitzgerald and Associates Real Estate



Posted by Fitzgerald and Associates Real Estate on 11/20/2017

This Multi-Family in Reading, MA recently sold for $510,000. This style home was sold by - Fitzgerald and Associates Real Estate.


1127 Main St, Reading, MA 01867

Multi-Family

$560,000
Price
$510,000
Sale Price

2
Units
2,836
Approx. GLA
Fantastic opportunity to own a 2 family in desirable Reading. An antique home with the abundance of land in a top rated school district. In good condition, the seller is providing the property vacant of all tenants. A long driveway allows the ease of several parking spots and plenty of grassy area for recreational activities. The first floor is enhanced by a large family room addition. The 2nd floor features a 3rd floor loft area with great potential for childrens play area or bedrooms.

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Fitzgerald and Associates Real Estate on 11/18/2017


182 Taft, Wilmington, MA 01887

Single-Family

$475,000
Price

6
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Newly remodeled, open concept garrison style home featuring a modern shaker style kitchen with upgraded Everest Quartzite countertops and brand new stainless steel appliances. Updates include all new plumbing, roofing, vinyl siding, deck, lighting, as well as new interior doors and trim. Hardwood floors throughout main and second floors. Large 550 sq ft deck partially covered overlooks a large back yard.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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Categories: Price Change  


Posted by Fitzgerald and Associates Real Estate on 11/17/2017

It's many homeowners' worst fear to come home to a water disaster in their home. Water damage can cost thousands to repair and will include a lengthy process in order to adhere to safety standards, potentially disrupting your home life for weeks. In this article we'll give you tips on how to avoid water damage and what to do when you discover it.

Water damage vs. flood damage

Many people are unaware of the difference between water damage and flood damage. Water damage can occur when you have plumbing issues such as a leaking pipe or overflowing bath tub. Flood damage, on the other hand, is defined by FEMA as an "overflow of inland or tidal waters, unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters," or even mudflow. Flood damage tends to be the more costly and the more dangerous of the two, as it puts home inhabitants at serious health risk. Part of the stipulation in differing between the two types of damage is insurance coverage; water damage is often covered by homeowner's insurance whereas flood damage is not.

Avoiding water damage

To avoid costly and time-consuming repairs, follow these steps to prevent water damage from occurring in your home:
  • Keep your gutters clean to avoid backups and drainage issues
  • divert rain water away from your house with downspouts
  • Disconnect hoses and turn off their water supply when temperatures drop to freezing overnight
  • Don't leave water using appliances running while you are away from home for extended periods of time
  • Keep up with maintenance on your dishwasher, washing machine, toilets, and tubs
  • Turn off your water main when you go away on vacations
  • Check the water pressure to your home. High water pressure can be nice in the shower, but pressures too high can cause your plumbing to fail
  • Check regularly for leaks. Some water damage may go unnoticed for weeks or months, which subjects you to another danger: mold

What to do if you have water damage in your home

If it's too late for prevention and you've discovered water damage in your home there are several steps you'll need to take to ensure the safety of your home.
  • Turn off electronics in the affected area. If possible switch off power to whole the whole section of your home at the circuit breaker. This first step is to ensure your own safety. Once you've turned off power to all potentially dangerous electronics, you can move on to the next step.
  • Remove electronics and other perishable items from the area. If you remove the items soon enough you might be able to salvage them by drying them out.
  • Soak up the bulk of the water. You can do this the old fashion way by using towels and buckets. Or you can use a wet/dry vacuum cleaner to suck up the water from rugs, carpets, and other surfaces.
  • Dry the area completely. To avoid mold, use fans and a dehumidifier to fully dry out the area.
  • Disinfect. Spray the area to remove any bacteria that may have accumulated due to moisture.
  • Contact the professionals. A contractor will be able to tell you the full extent of the damage and whether any serious repairs will need to me made.
 





Posted by Fitzgerald and Associates Real Estate on 11/12/2017


182 Taft, Wilmington, MA 01887

Single-Family

$489,900
Price

6
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Newly remodeled, open concept garrison style home featuring a modern shaker style kitchen with upgraded Everest Quartzite countertops and brand new stainless steel appliances. Updates include all new plumbing, roofing, vinyl siding, deck, lighting, as well as new interior doors and trim. Hardwood floors throughout main and second floors. Large 550 sq ft deck partially covered overlooks a large back yard.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Fitzgerald and Associates Real Estate on 11/10/2017

We've all heard of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. It has been ominously dubbed "the silent killer" because of its colorless, odorless, tasteless, and non-irritating properties. As children, we learn a great deal about fire safety, having drills at school and lessons at home from our parents. But many of us are in the dark when it comes to the causes of carbon monoxide poisoning and the best preventative measures to take. Read on to learn what you need to know about the silent killer to protect yourself and your family.

What produces carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide, or CO, is produced by burning fuels. Common items that emit CO gas, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, include:
  • motor vehicles
  • small engines
  • stoves
  • lanterns
  • grills
  • fireplaces
  • gas ranges
  • furnaces
We all have these items, and aside from common knowledge like not letting your car run in a closed garage, most of us don't know how to minimize risk.

Why is CO so dangerous?

Carbon monoxide, when inhaled, replaces the oxygen in our blood. If too much CO builds up in a closed room it can cause serious health problems or even death. Common symptoms from CO poisoning include:
  • headache
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • confusion
  • drowsiness
  • fast breathing or heart rate
If you experience any of these symptoms indoors you should immediately leave the house. If you suspect it could be carbon monoxide exposure call 911.

Who is at Risk?

Everyone can be exposed to carbon monoxide, but some are at greater risk than others. According to Mayo Clinic, the most at-risk people for CO poisoning include:
  • Unborn babies - fetal blood cells absorb CO faster than regular blood cells, therefore unborn babies experience oxygen deprivation much more rapidly
  • Children - kids take breaths more frequently than adults, making them more susceptible to CO poisoning
  • Older adults - older people are more likely to experience brain damage from CO exposure

What preventative steps can you take?

The home is full of potential dangers when it comes to CO poisoning. Here are some of the most important steps you can take to reduce risk:
  • Buy and maintain CO detectors for your home
  • Never use your oven to heat your home
  • Never leave a vehicle or small engine running in an enclosed space such as a shed or garage
  • Do not use a charcoal grill inside
  • Do not use a gas lantern inside a tent for prolonged periods of time
  • Don't run a generator in your home or basement
  • Have your chimney checked for blockages
  • Check the ventilation on your gas appliances
  • Fire safety is also carbon monoxide safety - breathing in smoke fumes from a house fire can cause CO poisoning and death
     




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